17 de julio de 2019
ÚLTIMAS NOTICIAS:
Hispanic World

Bolivia calls violence against women a national emergency

By Yolanda Salazar

 Tania Sanchez, director of the Ana Maria Romero Multinational Service for Women and Ending Patriarchy, tells EFE in an interview in La Paz on Monday, June 24, 2019, that this week the organization will present to Bolivia's Cabinet of Ministers its plan to declare violent female deaths a national emergency. EFE-EPA/Yolanda Salazar

Tania Sanchez, director of the Ana Maria Romero Multinational Service for Women and Ending Patriarchy, tells EFE in an interview in La Paz on Monday, June 24, 2019, that this week the organization will present to Bolivia's Cabinet of Ministers its plan to declare violent female deaths a national emergency. EFE-EPA/Yolanda Salazar

By Yolanda Salazar

La Paz, Jun 25 (efe-epa).- Faced with the alarming number of women slain by macho violence in Bolivia, the government institution for the protection of women plans to declare a national emergency as it implements a plan of action to prevent more femicides.

Tania Sanchez, director of the Ana Maria Romero Multinational Service for Women and Ending Patriarchy, told EFE in an interview that this week the organization will present to the Cabinet of Ministers its plan to declare violent female deaths a national emergency.

"The Cabinet meeting will decide on the best and most immediate measures capable of diminishing the number of crimes of violence," Sanchez said.

Between January and June 2019 at least 60 femicides have been committed in the country, a number almost identical to those in the same period last year, when 61 women were murdered.

However, "the most recent femicides totally alarm us because of the cruelty with which they were inflicted and the men who perpetrated them," the director said.

The most recent cases have been deaths by stabbing, suffocation and beatings, mostly perpetrated by husbands or former lovers of those murdered, and including two policemen.

Sanchez let it be known that the plan of action she proposes is focused on preventing violence toward women and also aims to "speed up an effective response by the different agencies and organizations" cooperating in the investigation of these cases.

"We are laying out a joint proposal that goes beyond whether to declare a state of emergency or not, for a plan of action that will help improve the government's response on the one hand, but will also summon an alliance of various organizations on the other," she said.

Of the murders verified up to June by the Attorney General's Office, only 14 cases were closed, either with a sentence or dismissal.

According to the director, Bolivia has a "package of legislative and regulatory measures" to do with the protection of women but they have never yet been correctly applied.

"Legislative progression has not kept up with the changes in our society," she said.

Since 2013 Bolivia has had a regulation protecting women from all kinds of violence and punishes femicide with 30 years in prison, the maximum penalty in this country.

Six years after the enactment of that regulation, Sanchez noted that more women are filing complaints all the time, but said there are still factors to be improved to make it effective.

"The regulation has been evaluated and it needs improvement, so we ask the Attorney General's Office to do its work," she said.

She added that prevention is an aspect that "has been less developed," but it is important to promote cooperation among all sectors of society to halt macho violence.

"The government is making greater efforts. We will be announcing those efforts and we hope they bear fruit very soon," she said.

The Multinational Service for Women and Ending Patriarchy was founded this year by means of a decree and has been operating for three months enacting policies against violence toward women and tracking the observance of public policies protecting women's rights.

The number of femicides in Bolivia has led Attorney General Juan Lanchipa to organize, because of this "extreme violence," a national meeting of representatives of different parts of society to deal with this problem.

Bolivia's Public Defender's Office has also launched a strategy for the prevention of violence to be imposed on the 175 municipalities around the country with the worst records of violence against women, teens and children.

Histórico de noticias
Bolivia's Torrez hopes she'll win Pan Am swimming medal in Lima

By Yolanda Salazar

5 Killed in drug rehab center in western Mexico

Mexico City, Jul 17 (efe-epa).- Five men were shot and killed at a drug rehabilitation center in Morelia, capital of the western Mexican state of Michoacan,...

Serra Pelada: 40 years of gold fever that devastated the Amazon jungle

By Alba Santandreu

Guatemalan migrants return from US with complaints re treatment in shelters

By Emiliano Castro Saenz

Ecuadorian women scientists slam gender gap in their profession

By Christian A. Sanchez

Trump refuses to criticize Turkey after Ankara buys Russian missiles

Washington, Jul 16 (EFE).- President Donald Trump on Tuesday refused to criticize the Turkish government of Recep Tayyip Erdogan after the Pentagon blocked...

Los Angeles, Jul 16 (epa-efe).- "Game of Thrones" on Tuesday racked up a record 32 Emmy Award nominations, thus becoming the series that has received the...

Mexican nature preserve could take 200 years to recover from fire damage

By Lourdes Cruz

Paraguay taxi drivers again at war with Uber

Asuncion, Jul 16 (efe-epa).- Hundreds of taxi drivers suspended their service this Tuesday to again drive through the streets of Asuncion with a long...

Dried-up Aculeo Lagoon shows the woes of climate change in Chile

By Alberto Peña

Trump doubles down on tweets against Democratic congresswomen

By Lucia Leal.

Princess Mako thanks Bolivia for 120 years welcoming Japanese migrants

La Paz, Jul 15 (efe-epa).- Princess Mako of Japan thanked Bolivia this Monday for the welcome it has extended over the past 120 years to Japanese migrants...

Mexico rules out being safe third country for migrants despite Trump's order

Mexico City, Jul 15 (efe-epa).- Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard on Monday ruled out that his country would become a "safe third country" for...

Salvadoran woman charged with abortion says she is innocent

Ciudad Delgado, El Salvador, Jul 15 (efe-epa).- Twenty-one-year-old Salvadoran Evelyn Hernandez said Monday that she is innocent of aggravated murder for...

Billionaire Buffett's real estate unit joins forces with Spain's LARVIA

New York, Jul 15 (efe-epa).- Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, the real estate unit of billionaire Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Inc. conglomerate,...

Residents of historic Panama neighborhood fight gentrification

By Maria M.Mur.

Pressure mounts for Puerto Rico governor's resignation amid scandal

San Juan, Jul 15 (efe-epa).- Pressure is mounting in Puerto Rico for Gov. Ricardo Rossello to resign after the revelation of the contents of private online...

Trump says tariffs taking a toll on China's economy

Washington, Jul 15 (efe-epa).- President Donald Trump said Monday that the tariffs imposed by his administration were taking a toll on China's economy,...

Barry weakens over Louisiana, but flooding alert remains in place

Washington, Jul 14 (efe-epa).- Tropical Storm Barry weakened to a tropical depression as it crossed the state of Louisiana on Sunday, heading...

San Juan Parangaricutiro, Mexico's Pompeii buried by Paricutin volcano

By Manuel Soberanes Cobo

Khya, a baby kangaroo being raised by humans in western Mexican city

By Mariana Gonzalez

Getting Florida coral to reproduce in captivity is big challenge

By Ivonne Malaver

Former FARC rebels turn to coffee growing in Colombia

By Claudia Polanco Yermanos

Mercosur to hold summit after long-awaited trade deal reached with EU

Natalia Kidd